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Biography Camps Immigration
George Scott

An only child, George Scott was born in 1930 in Budapest, Hungary. He was one year old when his father died and his mother returned to live with her parents, who owned a farm in a village 70 kilometers from the capital. George was brought up by his maternal grandparents. When George was 9, his mother became ill and was hospitalised, and his grandparents placed George in a Jewish orphanage. In April 1944, the hospital was emptied of all Jewish patients; George’s mother and the rest of his family was deported to Auschwitz.

In the summer of 1944, George  ran away from the orphanage but was captured on the border of Slovakia and was taken back to Hungary. He was deported to Auschwitz in August 1944. Later, as a slave labourer, he was transferred to Germany, first to Kaufering, then to Landsberg, and later to Augsburg. In April the prisoners were transferred by train to Dachau. George was liberated there on April 29, 1945 by the American army.

After the war he returned to the orphanage and continued to go to school until the fall of 1947. He then went to Germany with one of his teachers and ended up in the Kaufering Displaced Persons camp. He immigrated to Canada in 1948 as a war orphan with the help of the Canadian Jewish Congress.

He worked for Ontario Hydro for 13 years and then went into the advertising business. George got married in 1954 and has three children and many grandchildren. Since his retirement, George has been sharing his story with high school students as a Speaker at the Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre in Toronto.

Biography Camps Immigration
George Scott

An only child, George Scott was born in 1930 in Budapest, Hungary. He was one year old when his father died and his mother returned to live with her parents, who owned a farm in a village 70 kilometers from the capital. George was brought up by his maternal grandparents. When George was 9, his mother became ill and was hospitalised, and his grandparents placed George in a Jewish orphanage. In April 1944, the hospital was emptied of all Jewish patients; George’s mother and the rest of his family was deported to Auschwitz.

In the summer of 1944, George  ran away from the orphanage but was captured on the border of Slovakia and was taken back to Hungary. He was deported to Auschwitz in August 1944. Later, as a slave labourer, he was transferred to Germany, first to Kaufering, then to Landsberg, and later to Augsburg. In April the prisoners were transferred by train to Dachau. George was liberated there on April 29, 1945 by the American army.

After the war he returned to the orphanage and continued to go to school until the fall of 1947. He then went to Germany with one of his teachers and ended up in the Kaufering Displaced Persons camp. He immigrated to Canada in 1948 as a war orphan with the help of the Canadian Jewish Congress.

He worked for Ontario Hydro for 13 years and then went into the advertising business. George got married in 1954 and has three children and many grandchildren. Since his retirement, George has been sharing his story with high school students as a Speaker at the Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre in Toronto.

Biography Camps Immigration
George Scott

An only child, George Scott was born in 1930 in Budapest, Hungary. He was one year old when his father died and his mother returned to live with her parents, who owned a farm in a village 70 kilometers from the capital. George was brought up by his maternal grandparents. When George was 9, his mother became ill and was hospitalised, and his grandparents placed George in a Jewish orphanage. In April 1944, the hospital was emptied of all Jewish patients; George’s mother and the rest of his family was deported to Auschwitz.

In the summer of 1944, George  ran away from the orphanage but was captured on the border of Slovakia and was taken back to Hungary. He was deported to Auschwitz in August 1944. Later, as a slave labourer, he was transferred to Germany, first to Kaufering, then to Landsberg, and later to Augsburg. In April the prisoners were transferred by train to Dachau. George was liberated there on April 29, 1945 by the American army.

After the war he returned to the orphanage and continued to go to school until the fall of 1947. He then went to Germany with one of his teachers and ended up in the Kaufering Displaced Persons camp. He immigrated to Canada in 1948 as a war orphan with the help of the Canadian Jewish Congress.

He worked for Ontario Hydro for 13 years and then went into the advertising business. George got married in 1954 and has three children and many grandchildren. Since his retirement, George has been sharing his story with high school students as a Speaker at the Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre in Toronto.

Biography Camps Immigration
George Scott

An only child, George Scott was born in 1930 in Budapest, Hungary. He was one year old when his father died and his mother returned to live with her parents, who owned a farm in a village 70 kilometers from the capital. George was brought up by his maternal grandparents. When George was 9, his mother became ill and was hospitalised, and his grandparents placed George in a Jewish orphanage. In April 1944, the hospital was emptied of all Jewish patients; George’s mother and the rest of his family was deported to Auschwitz.

In the summer of 1944, George  ran away from the orphanage but was captured on the border of Slovakia and was taken back to Hungary. He was deported to Auschwitz in August 1944. Later, as a slave labourer, he was transferred to Germany, first to Kaufering, then to Landsberg, and later to Augsburg. In April the prisoners were transferred by train to Dachau. George was liberated there on April 29, 1945 by the American army.

After the war he returned to the orphanage and continued to go to school until the fall of 1947. He then went to Germany with one of his teachers and ended up in the Kaufering Displaced Persons camp. He immigrated to Canada in 1948 as a war orphan with the help of the Canadian Jewish Congress.

He worked for Ontario Hydro for 13 years and then went into the advertising business. George got married in 1954 and has three children and many grandchildren. Since his retirement, George has been sharing his story with high school students as a Speaker at the Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre in Toronto.